SBC and Early Termination Fees

This article was originally posted at this domain name on an old blogging system. I am consolidating all of my ramblings and drabble here.

sigh

Yet another FUBAR company to deal with. Yuk. I currently have SBC DSL service, from which I pull 1.3mb down, 70k up. Not awesome, but acceptable at $27 a month.

The contract ends on October 2nd. Cancellation before then results in a $200 early termination fee. Ouch. My plan is to have a cable modem installed in a few weeks, and leave the DSL dormant for a week or so until I cancel it. No big deal, right?

Here’s the problem. I’d like to replace my telephone line with a broadband phone service, either Vonage or most likely Lingo. I would like to use the Local Number Portability to transfer my home phone number over to the broadband service. They are claiming that it takes 15 - 20 business days for that to happen. Once the transfer is complete, service with the original provider is terminated. So, if they complete the cutover on October 1st, one day before my contract completes, I get nailed with a $200 early termination fee. Yuk.

This is yet another reason to hate contracts. Argh.

BlogShares

This article was originally posted at this domain name on an old blogging system. I am consolidating all of my ramblings and drabble here.

Interesting. I did a search today through Google to see how well madajczyk.com was indexed since I switched to Movable Type. Not many hits, but I did see that I got listed on BlogShares on August 27th. That’s kind of cool. Here’s a direct link.

Standard AT&T Wireless Bullshit

This article was originally posted at this domain name on an old blogging system. I am consolidating all of my ramblings and drabble here.

Yep.

Just what I thought. Leave it to AT&T Wireless to really figure out how to stick it to their exiting customers.

My wireless service contract concluded at the end of July. I decided to cancel my service on August 2nd, mainly since I really wasn’t using the phone. After I finished the call, I noticed that my cell phone was indeed cancelled, effective immediately. AT&T Wireless later processed the cancellation on August 4th, according to their own records.

On August 21st, AT&T billed me for another month of wireless service.

I noticed the charge today, and called their customer service line. After 30 minutes of waiting, I learn about their “end of billing cycle policy”.

That’s right folks! Cancel whenever you’d like; you still get the privledge of being charged until the end of the billing cycle.

So, after a year of service, they get that final shafting and stick me for about $18.00.

It’s not the money; it’s the principle of the thing.

Bullshit. Feel free to comment.

Drunk Mofo

This article was originally posted at this domain name on an old blogging system. I am consolidating all of my ramblings and drabble here.

Driving 31mph + 2 cases of beer = 1 bad night. [Edit: He wanted to make sure that I include the words “circumstantial evidence” when describing his evening. I have no idea why.]

This was recently experienced by a close friend of mine.

Oh well, he needs the exercise I guess. I mean, now he’s walking and all since he can’t find his license. Oh wait, that’s right, it’s now in the officer’s pocket…

Reducing RSS Bandwidth

This article was originally posted at this domain name on an old blogging system. I am consolidating all of my ramblings and drabble here.

RSS is a cool bit of technology, there’s no doubt about it. But larger sites definitely run into issues when it comes to lots of people consistently polling the RSS data feed to find updates.

What can possibly be done?

I have a tool that I developed internally a while back to automatically update DNS entries on dynamic DNS sites. To determine what the IP address is for remote sites that may not be able to determine their own IP address, I run a simple IP address site. If you browse to ip.deepbluegroup.com, you’ll see it simply returns your current IP address.

So why can’t RSS feeds provide a similar mechanism? Provide a token from the most recent RSS download, for example mysite.com/rssver.aspx or some such thing that returns the value. If you were to do the calculations, I’m sure you’d see a dramatic decrease in outgoing bandwidth.

Of course, all of the aggregators would need to know where to find the additional URI to see what the current token was, but that should be a simple matter. Hey, don’t look at me like that, I’m just the ideas man…